Students get life lesson in future careers

Amanda Schofield, an animal Technician from Vanier College, along with her dog Twill, spoke with Edgewater students Friday about a career as a veterinary technician. (Kristina Edson)
Amanda Schofield, an animal Technician from Vanier College, along with her dog Twill, spoke with Edgewater students Friday about a career as a veterinary technician. (Kristina Edson)

Awareness about advanced courses must start early

Grade 6 students from Edgewater Elementary School in Pincourt got a lesson in life last Friday when professionals representing many of the fields that most interest the students visited the school.

The day was the brainchild of Edgewater grade-6 teacher Marie-Christine Corriveau, who surveyed 51 students moving on next year to high school to find out, among other things, which careers most interested them.

“We wanted to know what they want to do in the future so they can start planning now,” she explained.

And the advice is more than sound. Students who do not take advanced science and math courses during their secondary I and II years, for example, often learn too late that they cannot apply for programs in medical, science or engineering based fields at the CEGEP level without doing some makeup work. Students missing the advanced courses that are offered in Sec. IV and V often have to take the missing courses through CEGEP pathways programs or through adult education schools.

Compounding the need for early awareness is the fact that in order to qualify for Sec. IV advanced math or science courses, students usually need to be in advanced level courses as early as Sec. II and Sec. III.

“It’s very early for them to know what they want to do for the rest of their lives, but hopefully this will help guide them in the right direction,” Corriveau said.

Nancy Battet, the Community & Partner Liaison for the Lester B. Pearson School Board helped Corriveau book eight visiting guests working in fields including science, journalism, flying, surgery, engineer/mechanic, acting, business and animal health.

“These types of career days, which we do at a lot of our elementary schools, open students’ eyes as early as elementary school and Cycle 3 to the jobs that will be open to them in the future,” Battet said.

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